Dermatology Focus – Warts

Dermatology is the study of the skin and its different health problems; warts are one of those conditions that affect the skin and have been researched along with potential remedies to fully understand their existence. You may want to check out West Dermatology – La Jolla/UTC for more. On the exterior layer of the skin, the wart itself is visibly seen and is caused by a virus. What most people don’t know is that a wart on the epidermis is probably a benign tumor. A DNA virus with two strands located in the bottom layer of the epidermis is HPV or human pappilomavirus; it replicates and forms what is seen as another layer of skin. There are several forms of HPV, one of which is related to cervical cancer, with numerous symptoms and complications.

Warts are quite a popular skin problem, but one that has more myths than its fair share! Those practicing dermatology will assist the general public with evidence and myths to decipher them. The idea that warts have roots is a good one to bring up – an unsightly thinking that is a misconception; warts do not have roots and only grow in the outer layer of skin, the epidermis.

While most warts are not painful, our health can cause more problems, and they are unpleasant to look at in any case! They protrude like cylinders from the skin – some fused together in separate layers, while others do not. This reality depends on where the wart is placed on the body and how dense the skin is. For example, if the wart was on the underside of the foot (it is normal just below the toes), due to the fusion of the layers, it would take on a mosaic appearance. There are black spots in certain warts that are essentially tiny blood vessels that have lost blood flow.

Warts are very popular in all their various sub-types, and the virus that causes warts can be picked up by all humans – only by coming into contact with another. Some warts can be gone as soon as they came, with a few weeks maybe clearing up; others can take years before they are absolutely gone. It is assumed that the speed at which a wart clears and the vulnerability of a person to contracting warts largely depends on their immune system. Those with immune diseases like AIDS may have to wait until the wart is gone for a longer time.

In dermatology, it is just as important to know about possible and validated remedies for warts as to understand their origin. In most cases, as administered by the family doctor, warts can be treated with an over-the-counter medicine. Salicylic acid, which must be applied to a wart on a regular basis, is one of the most prescribed remedies. In addition to this treatment, it is recommended to scrape the layers of the wart using a pumice stone; after that, the region is washed and a fresh layer of salicylic acid is added.

In the treatment of warts and as part of dermatology studies, cryotherapy or ‘freezing’ is sometimes used. This procedure utilizes liquid nitrogen that essentially freezes and destroys the cells inside the wart. This will not destroy the virus, which is then released back into the tissue of the skin and destroyed by the immune system of the body.